How To Create Real Estate Content

– On this episode I talk about turning points, content, real estate, and chugging. (upbeat music) You ask questions, and I answer them. This is the #AskGaryVee Show. (upbeat music) Hey everybody, this is Gary Vay-ner-chuk, and welcome to Episode 36 of the #AskGaryVee Show. Fun fact about the number 36: it’s the last time I’m doing a fun fact about a number. – Barry asks: “Gary, love to hear your opinion on whether a PR company or a person should be overseeing social media for a business.” – Barry, great question, and before I even answer it, I just want to thank you for being a long time interactor friend with me. I don’t like using the word fan, but I say it sometimes, it just slips. Barry, I’ve always enjoyed our conversations on Twitter over the last four years, so thrilled to have you on the show. I think I know where you’re going with this question, which is the notion of, VaynerMedia was built on coming into companies and taking the social media away from PR companies.

Some of the bigger PR companies in the world right now have built out social media departments and they’ve done a nice job, to varying degrees. I wanted to answer this question because I want to get people around the psychology of the difference between PR and social, and why I do think that, of course there’s people, hundreds of people in this company have worked in PR before, so there’s some great things about PR. Being able to handle pressure, the speed of it. The difference though, is PR is very B2B. When you’re a PR person and you’re working with a client, the Yankees, you’re trying to get them press in the New York Times, The New York Post, ESPN. You’re working directly with a human being who’s the gatekeeper to make a decision. When you’re doing social, you’re dealing with all the fans, and it’s much more B2C. So I don’t have a problem if a PR person or company is doing the social for a company or individual, I just want to make sure they have a different gear in their brand understanding, brain, not brand, but that was an interesting slip-up.

I just want to make sure they have that gear to know that they need to be looking at this as a B2C game, versus the B2B game that is PR. – eastcountytoday says, “Gary, love the iTunes touch. When was the moment you knew you would be okay when starting your company?” – East County, right? That’s a little bone thugs reference to episode, I can’t remember. East county, the moment I knew that I was gonna make it was the first day I walked into my dad’s liquor store. And the reason I decided to answer this question and trying to find value for everybody watching other than me bragging about that I had the bravado from day one was, the notion of not even worrying about that moment.

Meaning, one of the biggest things that I’m trying to teach, I’m turning a lot today. One of the things I’m trying to teach all my management here at VaynerMedia, and all my founders in my start-up investments and my co-founders in companies that had meeting with my co-founders at Resy last night, the number one thing I keep telling everybody is to not worry about the things that don’t matter.

Worrying about or trying to figure out, this is the moment when I made it, is something that I think cripples people, and I just don’t even think about those things. I could answer this question two ways, which are the two right ways, which is one: The moment I walked into my dad’s store, because I had that confidence, or I could answer the other way that’s equally as true, pulling on both sides like a bridge, which is, I haven’t made it yet.

They both are right, and the truth is, outside of this question, I don’t think about it at all, ever, period. And the reason I’m answering the question is because I’m trying to get as many of you who are watching the show right now to not worry about those things. Worry about executing, worry about feeling good about your life, don’t worry about making it. Because making it is an outside force. The inside force of you just doing it is what you should be focused on. – Kyle asks, “Gary, is there a way to drive traffic to a website when posting content directly to Facebook?” – Kyle, yes.

(bell ringing) As you can tell, that Facebook post on my fan page drove a crap load of traffic to my Medium article, which is content. I answered this question because I wanted to show you raw details because I think raw details is even a deeper version of this show, and I continue to try to go deep within myself to really drive you value, especially because this is only a 50 episode experiment. Just kidding. And so, the answer is absolutely. Facebook is actually probably one of the biggest drivers of content awareness outside of itself to other destinations in the world right now, so the question is, how do you do it organically, how do you do it in a paid, targeted way? What I just showed you was organic. I have a pretty big foundation of 150,000 fans on that page, but there’s people that I’ve seen post content that have 800 fans, and enough people shared it and enough people liked it, enough people commented it and shared it not only within Facebook but outside of it, that it created fire. Facebook is content awareness infrastructure in a 2015 world. So not only is there a way, I think it’s one of the singular best ways, and so I would highly recommend making an investment in Facebook fan pages, recognizing the distribution opportunities that it creates for content you’re putting outside of its network.

– Hey Gary, I’m a realtor, and our team puts out a lot of video. (bell ringing) – Ha, the ding. – In Episode Eight you said it was important to put up daily content, so my question to you is, if you were a realtor, what kind of daily video content would you produce? – So that was a tremendous video. Let’s all at the VaynerNation pay attention to multiple things, including he was wearing the R.O.I. of your mother T-shirt, the fact that he dinged the jab-jab-jab in the background, a random man walked by in the background, which is a reference to some of the stuff we’ve done on the show. If you’re listening on the podcast, I highly recommend you go to YouTube and watch this episode just to watch this video, ’cause it was tremendous. My answer is very simple. If I was a realtor, the thing that I would do more than anything is actually review the area around the places where I sell homes.

Let me explain. If I’m selling homes in Millburn, New Jersey, I’m putting out a daily piece of content reviewing the school, then I’m interviewing the individual teachers if I can get access to them, then I’m reviewing every local business, the Subway shop, the wine shop, then I’m interviewing literally people that have lived in the neighborhood for 50 years. I’m putting out content to make you romantic around the stories in the area, because people pick them for utility.

What I mean by that is, convenience of transportation, how quickly from the office, but they also pick because of the school systems, and there’s a lot of data out there on that, but how about making it a little warmer and interviewing Miss Robinson the third grade teacher,. And then obviously kind of the amenities around it, the playground, the best stores. I remember a realtor telling me that people moved to Short Hills because of Wine Library. I thought that was cool. It felt like such an anchor to that area. And so what I would do is daily content on the 20 mile radius or 10 mile radius around the area where you sell the homes.

The stories that are tucked away in the businesses and the school system, and the iconic neighbors that have been around forever, those stories are the narrative that will create emotion which will be on a tipping point scale, on a 50/50, may be the thing that tips someone to buying your home. – Sean asks, “Gary, most big successes have a huge turning point where things really take off. What was that turning point for Wine Library?” – Sean, great question. I guess there were some turning points when the Wine Spectator ad that we ran, the first New York Times full page ad, the time I reset the score and took 50% of the beer off the floor and added more wine, when I started WineLibrary.com, the day I started the email service, the day I jumped into Robert Parker’s forums in ’97 and became part of the internet community around wine, the 2000 Bordeaux Vintage, when we bought heavy, when I first started promoting wines nobody ever heard of on email, Richard Partridge Cabernet comes to mind, when I hired Brandon.

As you can tell, there are many moments that we made it, but it was just trucking along, building on top of each other step by step. My friends, if you listen to two of my answers on this show, you understand one very interesting thing about me, which is, I may have the energy of the hare, but I am the tortoise. (bell ringing) You know what I’m putting up there, right? That beautiful thing you did, Zak. Show Zak. You did a very nice job on that one. For everybody listening, I’m pointing to the tortoise and hare image I put out on Instagram.

Go check me out on Instagram/garyvee. Anyway, when I made it, the turning point moment, everybody who’s watching and asking these questions are looking for this sign, like I saw the sign, It’s not that. It’s head down, you love and believe in what you do, and you just never think about those moments, you just keep trucking along. It’s lunch pail mentality, it’s old school Eastern European put-in-the-work mentality. I don’t think about these things, guys. The Fortune 40 Under 40 that just happened, is that a turning point in my career? Sure, some people now think of me differently ’cause I’m in the context of those people, but it’s not. It’s just chug and chug and chug and chug and chug and chug and chug and chug, And so chug. Thanks for watching the show. You like that DRock? (giggling off camera) Don’t edit that part, I want your giggle in there. Thanks for watching the show everybody. Episode 36 in the bag. Question of the day. (sighs) You know, to use this whole theme of the show, question of the day, very simply, do you think you’re a chugger, or do you think that you had a turning point moment, and if it was, what was that? And by the way, Episode 35, we dropped off of the momentum of Episode 34 on the banter.

I’ve told you about the banter. I can’t be in this situation where I have to yell at you about banter and then it happens and then you fall off your next episode. I expected maybe 15 episodes, and I’d have to talk about banter again, but the community, get in the comments. Get in the comments. Thank you. You keep asking questions, I’ll keep answering them. Oh crap, wait, subscribe! I need subscriptions because I can’t push this many right hooks in social, so subscribe! .

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